My Blog

Posts for: March, 2017

By Paul David Epstein, D.M.D. & Associates, P.C.
March 28, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures

Suffering from a toothache is never a fun situation to find yourself in. Luckily, this unfortunate condition is treatable and does not always require tooth extraction. In fact, a toothache and other dental problems are preventable with some oral hygiene leg work and help from your dentist. Find out more about tooth decay, its treatments, and what you can do to prevent it with Dr. Paul Epstein in Burlington, MA.

Dental Fillings
Dental fillings are the treatment for a cavity which has not yet reached the tooth’s inner pulp chamber. Tooth decay eats away at a tooth little by little, eventually forming a hole. The treatment for a cavity is to remove the decay from the tooth completely. A filling fills in the hole left behind, leaving you with a natural appearance and functioning, sturdy tooth.

Root Canal Therapy 
A root canal removes decayed tissue and nerve from the inside of the tooth’s inner chamber. After removing the decayed tissue, your dentist fills the tooth using tooth-colored composite resin materials. Many root canals leave behind large fillings due to the access hole required to remove the decayed tissue. This requires a dental crown to protect your tooth from further damage and stabilize it against everyday use.

Dental Sealants
If you have ever undergone a dental filling or root canal, you may want to consider dental sealants. This layer of plastic applied to the teeth creates a barrier between the tooth’s naturally-occurring deep grooves on its biting surface and decay-causing outside elements like food particles and bacteria. Filling in these grooves prevents decay-causers from becoming trapped in the tooth and makes cleaning the tooth easier and more effective.

Dental Services in Burlington, MA 
Your dentist is an expert in treating and preventing conditions like tooth decay and gum disease. However, you must commit to a strong at-home oral care routine and bi-annual dental examinations and cleanings every six months to keep tooth decay and gum disease at bay. Patients who have a higher risk for these conditions may need to see their dentist more frequently.

For more information on dental services offered in Burlington, MA, please contact Dr. Paul Epstein. Call (781) 273-1152 to schedule your appointment with Dr. Epstein today!


By Paul David Epstein, D.M.D. & Associates, P.C.
March 16, 2017
Category: Oral Health
JamieFoxxChipsaTooth-ThisTimebyAccident

Some people are lucky — they never seem to have a mishap, dental or otherwise. But for the rest of us, accidents just happen sometimes. Take actor Jamie Foxx, for example. A few years ago, he actually had a dentist intentionally chip one of his teeth so he could portray a homeless man more realistically. But recently, he got a chipped tooth in the more conventional way… well, conventional in Hollywood, anyway. It happened while he was shooting the movie Sleepless with co-star Michelle Monaghan.

“Yeah, we were doing a scene and somehow the action cue got thrown off or I wasn't looking,” he told an interviewer. “But boom! She comes down the pike. And I could tell because all this right here [my teeth] are fake. So as soon as that hit, I could taste the little chalkiness, but we kept rolling.” Ouch! So what's the best way to repair a chipped tooth? The answer it: it all depends…

For natural teeth that have only a small chip or minor crack, cosmetic bonding is a quick and relatively easy solution. In this procedure, a tooth-colored composite resin, made of a plastic matrix with inorganic glass fillers, is applied directly to the tooth's surface and then hardened or “cured” by a special light. Bonding offers a good color match, but isn't recommended if a large portion of the tooth structure is missing. It's also less permanent than other types of restoration, but may last up to 10 years.

When more of the tooth is missing, a crown or dental veneer may be a better answer. Veneers are super strong, wafer-thin coverings that are placed over the entire front surface of the tooth. They are made in a lab from a model of your teeth, and applied in a separate procedure that may involve removal of some natural tooth material. They can cover moderate chips or cracks, and even correct problems with tooth color or spacing.

A crown is the next step up: It's a replacement for the entire visible portion of the tooth, and may be needed when there's extensive damage. Like veneers, crowns (or caps) are made from models of your bite, and require more than one office visit to place; sometimes a root canal may also be needed to save the natural tooth. However, crowns are strong, natural looking, and can last many years.

But what about teeth like Jamie's, which have already been restored? That's a little more complicated than repairing a natural tooth. If the chip is small, it may be possible to smooth it off with standard dental tools. Sometimes, bonding material can be applied, but it may not bond as well with a restoration as it will with a natural tooth; plus, the repaired restoration may not last as long as it should. That's why, in many cases, we will advise that the entire restoration be replaced — it's often the most predictable and long-lasting solution.

Oh, and one more piece of advice: Get a custom-made mouthguard — and use it! This relatively inexpensive device, made in our office from a model of your own teeth, can save you from a serious mishap… whether you're doing Hollywood action scenes, playing sports or just riding a bike. It's the best way to protect your smile from whatever's coming at it!

If you have questions about repairing chipped teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Artistic Repair of Chipped Teeth With Composite Resin” and “Porcelain Veneers.”


By Paul David Epstein, D.M.D. & Associates, P.C.
March 01, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: composite resins  
4AdvantagestoUsingCompositeResinsforRestoringTeeth

Restoring chipped, stained or decayed teeth with dental porcelain is a tried and true method that’s been used for decades. In recent years, though, restorations made with composite resin have become a popular alternative.

Made of a plastic-based matrix with added glass filler, composite resin can be molded and bonded to teeth to replace missing structure with color to match. While they can’t be used for every problem situation, they’re an efficient and economical way to transform your smile.

Here are 4 advantages for using composite resin to restore moderately defective teeth.

They require very little tooth preparation. Crowns, veneers and other porcelain restorations require removing some healthy tooth structure to accommodate them. With the development of stronger bonding materials, composite resins can restore even many large defects in teeth caused by decay or trauma with little structural removal and still remain durable.

Most composite resin restorations are “single-visit” procedures. Unlike porcelain restorations, applying composite resin doesn’t require a dental lab, a process that can take multiple visits. In most cases, a skilled dentist can apply them during a single visit.

They have excellent color matching capabilities. We usually think of teeth as one single shade of white — actually, a single tooth can have varying gradations of color from the root to the tip. As mentioned before, composite resins can be prepared to match those color shades precisely, so your restored teeth look natural and blend well with your other teeth.

Composite resins can be an effective temporary fix for young injured teeth. Because children’s teeth are still developing, permanent restorations for traumatized teeth aren’t usually advisable until they’ve fully matured. Composite resin can be used to restore a young tooth’s form and function until it’s ready for a permanent solution.

If you would like more information on restoring teeth with composite resin, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth with Composite Resin.”